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View Full Version : Let us talk about Real-life super heroes



mulambo
Aug 22, 2018, 23:29
Lol, read this, there are people which read just too many comics and now they believe they can work as policemen... for free and without license.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real-life_superhero

What, in your opinion, can turn a normal person into a "real life super-hero". And how possibly that "super-hero" be intentionally used to describe a person who literally has no super power, beside being obsessed with his/her own personality so much (if such pathology can be considered as a "power" of course)?
Share your thoughts. :grin:

Um cool
Aug 23, 2018, 12:34
There are no such things as a hero or a villain, let alone a "super" hero or "super" villain. These people, from what I know, just walk around the streets and call the police when they see something. Not really "super" honestly just helping out scanning the area or something.

What can turn a person into a costumed scanner walking around the street calling the police? Obsession with media heroes of course. I believe it's more than that though. We don't know their identity yet. They could have a troubled past (or even present) yet be the rare part that wants to help out society rather than hurt it. They could see "hey I can actually do something and feel useful" but that's assuming they are poor and feel useless to begin with, which I think might be the case. Have you seen the rooms of some of these guys? Everyone's story is different, and just like Batman, Superman, or mostly any super whatever an event sparked their change to see justice be brought. (Hee hee that sounded corny)

Uyulala
Aug 23, 2018, 13:26
There were some of them around but their activities were just clean the street of garbage or scolding the people they saw throwing it outside the container, never tried to be the police or something like that.

mulambo
Aug 23, 2018, 13:32
We don't know their identity yet. Actually some of them, like Phoenix Jones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Jones have revealed their identity. In my opinion: lack of attention from parents, egotism or probably just the will to show up. Some people describe them as "misguided" and I agree, because there are already authorities doing their job, those "super heroes" are probably just brainwashed people which try to make their life less senseless by pretending to be authorities or someone important. It's an effect of brainwashing. Probably some of them really want to help society, but why doing it under a costume? Some of them reply to this by saying " a superhero must keep his identity hidden " that's just a lie. They get stabbed, beaten or shot anyway... no matter if they wear a costume or not. What's the difference? If they want to inspire other people to bring more justice, why don't they do it hide themselves? Because they're living in a dream.

On a side note: how can you help society if you got personality issues? Didn't the wise ones said " Help yourself first, if you want to help others" ?

Social justice may be just a justification for their personality issues, from this point of view.

Uyulala
Aug 23, 2018, 16:11
Maybe they don't know about their personality issues, or simply ignore them.

Uyulala
Aug 24, 2018, 01:12
Just read a little of Phoenix Jones' biography, never imagined they could try to do things like that :talktomyhand:

I don't like to talk bad of the crazy people though, that's why don't want to say that Mulambo is right.

mulambo
Aug 24, 2018, 04:02
yeah I've probably been a bit unrespectful and sarcastic, I respect those people which really believe (probably, can't be sure) about what they do. My attempt is not to ridiculize them, but on a first impression I imagined it becoming something "viral" as a prophetic thing, everything nowadays becomes viral for a reason or so... I just imagined all people dressing like superheroes and I thought what the world could become, lol

Sol Badguy
Aug 24, 2018, 04:21
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xAltmrwbqI

AvengedDeathAlert
Aug 24, 2018, 15:31
There are quite a number of inspirational quotes about this:
"Good times create weak men, weak men create hard times, hard times create strong men, strong men create good times, and the cycle goes on..."
"There is a hero bit in everyone; it's up to each to choose how much to use it."
"Just by reporting crimes, you are good enough to be a hero!"

Those aside, I think heroes in real life are those who stand up for the good changes. Still, I'm not really sure if those who punished criminals with fearful laws or those who actually try to teach and help them the good common sense are better. They are their own respective heroes, it seems.

mulambo
Aug 24, 2018, 16:22
"Just by reporting crimes, you are good enough to be a hero!"
no mentions about the necessity of a costume ? :D


Those aside, I think heroes in real life are those who stand up for the good changes. Still, I'm not really sure if those who punished criminals with fearful laws or those who actually try to teach and help them the good common sense are better. They are their own respective heroes, it seems. probably you're talking about corruption of authorities. well, I guess that's just stress or a bad education. Some of "them" (them cops, I mean) are just born natural bullies, they're chosen because of their natural attitude to impose their force on others (no matter if they follow ethics or not), some others are smart***es that get into the job just to take advance of it (highest form of corruption, it seems), but some others are people which believe in what they do. I mean, if a superhero is anyone helping justice, then justice can be applied on those who apply justice too (those cops which are corrupted, for example).

DisturbedChronos
Oct 08, 2018, 01:32
they don't exist.

led_spirals
Oct 08, 2018, 01:59
4250

AugresiV
Oct 17, 2018, 01:13
Christ (Jesus) once said 'Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends' (John 15:13). A 'hero', or what makes one (as well as what makes a ''villain') has always been subjective and argumentative. No one person has ever defined a solid definition that was agreeable by the masses. My personal definition of a hero/heroine is one who has given up everything, and is willing to sacrifice everything, for a friend, or even a complete stranger. It doesn't have to always mean 'biological'; it can be long hours as a volunteer. Hell, those who spent weeks to months on a burned-out MUGEN database so new and future players can enjoy the MUGEN world are heroes/heroines, as well as the creator who skipped a semester in 3D technology to spend time helping next-gen creators understand coding and its ins and outs. Those who give in finances, whether it be a billion dollars to a cleaner planet, or a poor college student who gives his/her last dollar to help a nameless homeless person get something to eat. It can even be personal, as downtime, where one sacrifices hanging out and doing things to concentrate and help create a better person, starting with oneself, so the day he/she can be that much greater and, perhaps, understand what makes a 'hero/heroine' starting with the will to love oneself. The love you give to others comes from the love one gives to him/herself, and the heroism magnifies itself and the efforts thereafter and completes the willingness to give whatever it takes to be a hero

mulambo
Oct 20, 2018, 13:22
Christ (Jesus) once said 'Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends' (John 15:13). A 'hero', or what makes one (as well as what makes a ''villain') has always been subjective and argumentative. No one person has ever defined a solid definition that was agreeable by the masses. My personal definition of a hero/heroine is one who has given up everything, and is willing to sacrifice everything, for a friend, or even a complete stranger. It doesn't have to always mean 'biological'; it can be long hours as a volunteer. Hell, those who spent weeks to months on a burned-out MUGEN database so new and future players can enjoy the MUGEN world are heroes/heroines, as well as the creator who skipped a semester in 3D technology to spend time helping next-gen creators understand coding and its ins and outs. Those who give in finances, whether it be a billion dollars to a cleaner planet, or a poor college student who gives his/her last dollar to help a nameless homeless person get something to eat. It can even be personal, as downtime, where one sacrifices hanging out and doing things to concentrate and help create a better person, starting with oneself, so the day he/she can be that much greater and, perhaps, understand what makes a 'hero/heroine' starting with the will to love oneself. The love you give to others comes from the love one gives to him/herself, and the heroism magnifies itself and the efforts thereafter and completes the willingness to give whatever it takes to be a hero
I agree, but if it's a sacrifice for them, then the sacrifice will require a victim (and they're the victims of their own sacrifice).
So I think a proper "hero" is a person who has been "lifted" to his symbolic position by the ways of his/her "charme"... and charme is difficult to describe. It can be just pumped-up reputation, mythization or a godly guidance or higher intelligence. A hero can be an unknown/unpopular man who attracts no attention, in your example. Modern heroes are different.
Values have changed, so the requirements of being hero did too. Once a hero was somebody who liberated a certain context from a certain evil/menace/trouble/problem/etc... but we all dig in relativism, as that person was a hero for somebody and just a mess for the other part (evil itself).
Nowadays the universal evil is boredom, so anyone who brings entertainment is a "hero" and everybody wants to become a "hero", even by risking to become one of the many spammers. It's democratization.

I think the word "superhero" is referenced to the new gods of consumerism (Marvel, DC,etc.. "superheroes") which are nothing but something that somebody did before (Krishna, for example, had supernatural powers above any living creature in the universe). These figures are not only intended to make the human meditate about the limits of the body (same limits which superhero-wannabes seem to ignore) but also to astonish the audience (that's why they're exploited by those who really don't believe in them).

Just an example: when DC made Superman die... there were people really believing he was dead. This means they really believed he was alive, lol. If certain "superheroes" make people so stupid to make them believe that a symbol is the real thing, then those "superheroes" are just servants of evil, if we recognize ignorance as evil. That's why I think superhero-wannabes are totally brainwashed. Comics are the new Bible, nothing has changed in its substance, it only changed form. Once religion was an elite thing, only certain socially-financially higher people could get into it (so they could use religion as a way to manipulate the poor). Nowadays anyone who can afford a comic book can have something to believe in, somebody to identify with.
So those characters are like "gods", and that's ok as long as it prevents people from going crazy. But if somebody makes a god out of himself, then he's a schizo, lol

milbury
Oct 20, 2018, 17:23
So-called 'real life super heroes' do exist but they are mostly crazy LARPers in costumes. Adrian Veidt from Watchmen had the right idea, even if they can stop an odd mugging here and there or pick up trash they don't really make much of a difference and are doing it more for themselves than for others.

I've read the theory that super heroes are a modern day reaction to secularism. For most of our history we've believed in gods that were basically like superheroes when you think about it, deities like Hercules or Krishna as mulambo mentioned, they were worshipped but also revered in a sort of human way, they were beings that were divine but also human in a way. Superheroes are basically like that, and because modern science tells us that religion is stupid and backwards we moon over them (or worse, celebrities :sick:) instead.